"An ambivalent justice? Charles Taylor is guilty. So what? Has justice been served? There are other people who aided and abetted war in Liberia, Sierra Leone and elsewhere? Burkina Faso's Blaise Campaore was a chief supplier of arms and war machineries to Charles Taylor during his heydays. Murmur Qaddafi and Houphouet Boigny supported Charles Taylor's reign of terror.

 

Charles Taylor was aided and given a free passage from a maximum American prison in Boston. Has the ICC investigated how and why did Taylor escape US prison in the 1980s. Could the ICC bring to book those who aided and abetted Charles Taylor and his rebel activities? Some people committed serious mayhem in Liberia and today they are roaming the corridors of power and governance. Will these people ever be brought before the ICC to answer for the wrong doings?

 

Justice is for all and cannot be selective! Only when these other perpetrators are tried and verdicts passed, for or against, even posthumously, would justice be served fully. Till then, the Charles Taylor case will remain a classic example of selective and ambivalent justice." Alston C. Armah

 

It is now a full-gone decision that the UN-back Special Court on Sierra Leone has convicted former Liberian President Charles Taylor for "aiding and abetting" crimes against humanity in Sierra Leone’s long-running civil war.

 

However, murmuring has begun as to how contended the prosecution is concerning the verdict itself, while third eye seems to wink at who really aided and abetted in the commission of crimes against humanity in Sierra Leone when the country faced 11 years of rebel war.

 

According to sources close to The Hague, prosecution has been unhappy as to the degree of verdict that only highlighted "aiding and abetting" crimes against humanity rather than emphasizing "joint criminal enterprise and command responsibility," which constitute very serious charges that could harness Mr. Taylor’s sentence.

 

Analysts further have gone beyond the acclaimed recipient who has been convicted, deducing that the very international community that is building up pieces of evidence by whatever means to convict Mr. Taylor needs to equally be held liable for " aiding and abetting" crimes against humanity in Sierra Leone.

 

"Countries that manufacture weapons in the very international community knew of the consequences of war yet they traded guns that were shaped to West Africa some landing in Sierra Leone and Liberia for warfare," one analyst commented.

 

The In Profile Daily website has also captured comments from many of its readers on the Taylor’s verdict, as one particular comment seems to hit the international community on what appears to be syndicated conspiracy to prove evidence against Mr. Taylor, when major players in the killing, amputating and terrorizing people in Sierra Leone have been left out. "An ambivalent justice? Charles Taylor is guilty. So what? Has justice been served? There are other people who aided and abetted war in Liberia, Sierra Leone and elsewhere? Burkina Faso's Blaise Campaore was a chief supplier of arms and war machineries to Charles Taylor during his heydays. Murmur Qaddafi and Houphouet Boigny supported Charles Taylor's reign of terror. Charles Taylor was aided and given a free passage from a maximum American prison in Boston. Has the ICC investigated how and why did Taylor escape US prison in the 1980s. Could the ICC bring to book those who aided and abetted Charles Taylor and his rebel activities? Some people committed serious mayhem in Liberia and today they are roaming the corridors of power and governance. Will these people ever be brought before the ICC to answer for the wrong doings?" the online reader, Alston has stressed.

 

He continues: "Justice is for all and cannot be selective! Only when these other perpetrators are tried and verdicts passed, for or against, even posthumously, would justice be served fully. Till then, the Charles Taylor case will remain a classic example of selective and ambivalent justice".

 

An unspecified number of Liberians, some supporters of the trial against Mr. Taylor and others, outright opposition to the trial have surmised a future conflict Liberia’s generations yet unborn may have with their Sierra Leonean counterparts.

 

Analysis has been drawn from some quarters that Great Britain and America have created a predicament that Liberia and Sierra Leone have to contend with and as one analyst indicated, "Sierra Leoneans will boast of how they subdued a former Liberian President while Liberians will recall many instances of instabilities in Liberia that were hatched from Sierra Leone with impunity in the past".